Swamp Life

Life and landscape in Newcastle, NSW

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Post # 20: Architectural Crime no.4

Is anyone else alarmed at the boxing in of Hunter Street? Here is the latest wall that has gone up in Hunter Street West, an area apparently Council are trying to liven up. How, then, did this get building approval? This new development has created a dead zone — the sort of area that makes you speed up to get past it. Bad move Lawlers, and bad work Council.

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Post #17: Architectural crime #3

In a quiet street near Broadmeadow Station sits a charming postwar house, probably built about 1950. Built in a time of austerity and do-it-yourself, it is modest in scale and simple in style, but beautiful in detail. It has the typical corbelled gable ends of the era (a nod to art deco), cream patterned brickwork, and a delightful wrought iron balustrade (which I have previously posted).

I am reposting this house, because, alas, we’ll never see it again. It is now all finished up. Yes, it has been bulldozed. From this …

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To this …

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I await with interest to see what takes its place, but I’m betting that whatever is next built there will not be modest in scale, simple in style, or beautiful in detail. And I’m doubling my bet that the stunning wrought iron won’t be seen here again.

I can only hope that the wrought iron has been salvaged by someone of vision and will be reworked somewhere else.

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(photo of main house courtesy Google Maps)

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Post #16: Someone else who likes wrought iron

I’ve had some correspondence from a friend who also admires the undervalued architectural details of suburban Newcastle. Roland Bannister of Mayfield has kindly sent me some of his observations from his area:

Wrought iron:

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I love this next one: a foreigner maybe from the BHP, but nevertheless, Novacastrian folk art:

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My 14 year-old daughter would describe this wrought iron garnish as “adorable”:

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Of the following photo, Roland says: “Then there’s a favourite of mine: the drinking fountain in the old bowling club in King Edward Park, the place where ‘they’ intend to build a conference centre. I do hope that they keep the bubbler. The bricklayer must have been pleased with his work.” 

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And: “‘Sunrise’ bricks were very common in Newcastle. These days a few choice patches of them remain.”:

And to finish, a little out of our zone, but I am still pleased to publish the following — in Roland’s words: “And finally, you may not have had the chance to see the men’s urinal in the Newling Building at UNE, Armidale. The elegant design of the copper pipes is a wonder.”

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